Lemon Herb Chicken Romano

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Jessica from the blog How Sweet Eats is one of the funniest, hyperbolic, and creative recipe makers out there. I love her and her blog to pieces and even though we’ve never met, I consider her a friend in that totally-weird-virtual-friend way.  I always look forward to her over-the-top recipes and hilarious musings. Reading her blog is a serious delight for me, her conversational tone and drool-worthy photos get me every time, and I’m sure her legions of fans would agree. And, it’s a major year for her! I mean, she just published her first book, moved, and is expecting an amazing baby-bundle in just a few months. She’s a serious super-girl.

That said, it’s no wonder her new cookbook, Seriously Delish, is such a stunner. I mean, it’s packed with her tell-tale creative recipes and signature writing style, plus tons of gorgeous photos to go with. So, to celebrate the release of Jessica’s first (and I am sure not last) cookbook, I knew I had to share something with you all from it’s pages and it was no easy choice. There are seriously SO MANY enticing recipe to choose from–I mean, HELLO Baked Black Raspberry Oatmeal with a Brown Butter Drizzle, or Bacon Manhattans, or Slow Cooker Short Rib Breakfast Hash, or S’mores Hot Fudge Shakes…UGH! Anyway, I decided to go with one of her mother’s classic recipes, the kind you’d serve to people you love, Lemon Herb Chicken Romano, because it’s mom-approved and it’s cheese crusted. WIN.

To continue the celebration, in collaboration with her publisher, I’m giving away a copy of Seriously Delish to a lucky reader! Cue the confetti-blast emoji’s!! Just leave a comment below about the last seriously delish thing you ate or made and a winner will be chosen at random on September 24th.
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[recipe]

Print Recipe

Lemon-Herb Chicken Romano

From Seriously Delish by Jessica Merchant of How Sweet Eats

4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 cup all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons dried parsley

1 teaspoon garlic powder

4 large eggs

1 tablespoon whole milk

1 cup freshly grated romano cheese

2 tablespoons canola oil

1/2 cup dry white wine

1/3 cup low-sodium chicken stock

2 lemons

4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into pieces

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

cooked pasta to serve

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Season the chicken with salt and pepper.

Set up an assembly line of 3 bowls. Add the flour, dried parsley, and garlic powder to one bowl. Add the eggs and milk to the next and beat lightly. Add the cheese to the last bowl.

Heat a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add the canola oil. Dredge a piece of chicken through the flour, coating it completely. Add it to the egg, coating it once more. Finally, add it to the cheese and press so the cheese adheres to the chicken. Add the chicken to the skillet, and repeat with the remaining chicken breasts. Cook each breast until golden on each side, about 5 minutes per side. Be gentle when flipping so you don’t lose the coating. Once the chicken is browned, add the wine to the skillet and turn off the heat. Add the chicken stock and juice of 1 lemon. Cut the other lemon into wedges and place them in the skillet. Add the butter pieces to the skillet.

Cover the skillet and bake the chicken for 20-25 minutes. Remove the chicken from the oven and sprinkle with chopped parsley. Let cool for 5 minutes before serving. [/recipe]

Betty Crocker: Recent Favorites

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It’s been a crazy week, guys! I went to Reno to for a visit and to spend time with my wonderful friends and family, squeeze my nieces and baby friendlings (the term Sean uses to call our friends new babies). My mom and BFF threw me a perfetly casual, relaxed baby shower at The Chocolate Bar–there was fondue and lots of chit-chat involved.  Along with the shower and the near constant somersaults/tumbling this babe is doing, this whole pregnancy thing is starting to get really real.

Anyway, I did a lot of lounging and hanging out and absolutely zero cooking. So, to end this week I’ve gathered a little round-up of some of my current projects with my girls at Betty Crocker. There’s a good mix of indulgent desserts and dinner appropriate fare, I hope you enjoy!

Rainbow Chip Bundt with Fresh Raspberry Glaze 

No-Bake Lemon Mousse Tart with Fresh Berries

Slow Cooker Beef Fry-Bread Tacos 

Baked Carrot Cake Doughnuts

 Peanut Butter and Potato Chip Layered Cookie Bars

Black Forest Mini Pies

 Skillet Roasted Whole Chicken with Lemon and Potatoes

Crunchy Panko Fish Sticks with Quick Lemon-Herb Aioli

Jap Chae – Korean Glass Noodles with Vegetables

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Guys, I made you something very near and dear to my food-lovin’ heart. It’s a food of my people and of my childhood. I think most people think of kimchi when they think of Korean food, but these noodles are a staple in Korean cuisine as well.

Jap chae!

Jap chae is a traditional Korean dish made with sweet potato starch noodles. I usually don’t make this dish, I often buy it from the Korean market, where they make it fresh, or I just have my mom make it for me. After I made this batch and instagrammed it, my mom called to tell me it looked beautiful. Let me tell you guys, this was a major deal. Korean-mother approval= MAJOR! The noodles are clear, stretchy, and delightfully chewy. The ingredients are super simple and this dish comes together quickly after a little bit of chop-chopping and prep. It’s the dish most of my non-Korean friends fall for first when introducing them to Korean fare. My BFF loves these noodles and affectionately refers to them as “sticky-hand noodles”.

When I was a kid, these noodles were probably one of my favorite foods ever. I mean, they are stretchy…just like those sticky-hands you get out of those toy machines near the front doors of the supermarket…and they’re noodle-y! I have always loved noodles and Jap Chae is definitely one of my favorite noodle dishes of all time…plus, it picnics like a champ since it is just as delish at room temperature as it is warm.

[recipe]

Print Recipe

Jap Chae – Korean Glass Noodle with Vegetables

For this recipe the right kind of noodle is key. Look for Korean glass noodles, a sweet potato starch noodle that can be found at a well-stocked Asian Market or order them online*. They are gray and semi-translucent, dried noodles that become clear and stretchy with cooked.

Sauce:

3-4 tablespoons soy sauce (I use low-sodium)

2-3 tablespoons maple syrup (or sugar)

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Noodles:

8 ounces  dried Korean Glass noodles

8 ounces baby spinach

8 ounces button or cremini mushrooms, sliced

1 large carrot, julienned

5 green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces

2 cloves garlic, minced

canola oil for sautéing

toasted sesame seeds for garnish

In a small dish whisk together the soy, maple, and sesame oil. Set aside.

In a skillet wilt the spinach with a little bit of oil and a pinch of salt. Once just wilted, stir in 1/3 of the minced garlic. Remove from skillet and set aside.

Wipe out the skillet and add a bit more oil. Add the sliced mushrooms and a pinch of salt. Cook the mushrooms until all of the liquid they release evaporates and the mushrooms begin to brown around the edges. Add 1/3 of the minced garlic and stir to combine. Remove from the skillet and set aside.

Wipe out the skillet and cook the carrots with a pinch of salt and the remaining garlic a minute or two until the carrots are just warmed through but still crisp. Add the green onions and cook an additional 60 seconds. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Bring a large pot of water to boil. Drop the dried noodles into the boiling water and cook about 8 minutes or until noodles are clear, stretchy and tender. Immediately pour into a colander to drain and rinse  well with cold water. This helps improve the texture of the noodles. In a large bowl toss the sauce and vegetables with the noodles to coat. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve warm or room temperature. [/recipe]

*This post contains links for reference.